Editorial http://cameroon-concord.com Wed, 16 Aug 2017 13:21:28 +0000 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management en-gb 10 starting points for the European Marshall Plan with Africa … case study, Cameroon and Paul Biya, under the shield of Françafrique http://cameroon-concord.com/9070-10-starting-points-for-the-european-marshall-plan-with-africa-case-study-cameroon-and-paul-biya-under-the-shield-of-francafrique http://cameroon-concord.com/9070-10-starting-points-for-the-european-marshall-plan-with-africa-case-study-cameroon-and-paul-biya-under-the-shield-of-francafrique 10 starting points for the European Marshall Plan with Africa … case study, Cameroon and Paul Biya, under the shield of Françafrique



1.    WE NEED A NEW PACT ON THE FUTURE BETWEEN EUROPE AND AFRICA
– Africa’s population is set to double by 2050. It will then be home to 20 per cent of all people in the world. Ensuring that hundreds of millions of young Africans have enough food, energy and jobs and that their natural resources are protected presents massive challenges but also opportunities. European countries in particular can play a role in tackling these massive challenges by offering their knowledge, innovations and technological advances and getting directly involved.

→ Cameroon’s dictator Paul Biya, like some other long-term dictators in the two Franc currency zones of Africa, who were enthroned by France to serve the interests of French corporations and Swiss banks, does not protect the natural resources of Cameroon, but exploits them recklessly to fill not only his private pockets but mainly the pockets of foreigners, who allow him a luxurious life in hotels in Geneva and Paris’ shopping miles.    

2.    AFRICA NEEDS AFRICAN SOLUTIONS
– The founding of the African Union (AU) and launching of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) were encouraging expressions of Africa’s desire to make a fresh start. And reform-minded politicians have outlined Africa’s own vision of the continent’s future in the AU’s Agenda 2063. Germany and Europe must now listen to what African countries are saying and bring a new quality and a new dimension to their cooperation with Africa. We need to move away from the donor-recipient mentality that has predominated for many decades and shift towards an economic partnership based on initiative and ownership. Africa is Europe’s partner – not only on matters of economic cooperation and development policy but also in such key policy areas as trade, finance, the environment, agriculture, economics, foreign affairs and security.

→ Cameroon’s 84-year old dictator Paul Biya likes the “Françafrique” and not any original African solution. He also does not desire a fresh start. Instead, he puts reform-minded politicians in prison and tortures or exiles them. Then, he is only too happy, that the African Union is postponing reform goals until 2063 and that naïve European politicians keep sending economic delegations to him without asking his legitimacy as president of a country. They keep hoping that a little different “development help” under the new color of a “new partnership” but with the same old embezzler-in-chief would work differently, although his ministers eat up half of the expected profits as bribe as usual.   

3.    PRIORITISING JOBS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
– It is vital that Africa’s young people can see a future for themselves in Africa. The average age in Africa is 18. Soon Africa’s population will top 2 billion. That means that 20 million new jobs will be needed each year, in both urban and rural settings. Developing the necessary economic structures and creating new employment and training opportunities will be the central challenge. Africa’s young people also need contact and interaction with Europe. Europe must develop a strategy that allows for legal migration whilst combating irregular migration and people smuggling.

→ Cameroon’s illegitimate, never democratically elected dictator Paul Biya, since 35 years in power by the mercy of France, also creates new jobs for the youth, both in urban and in rural settings, although new jobs for the youth are not in Cameroon, but abroad … mostly out of Africa. Because most young people, who come out of Cameroon’s schools or universities have to learn, that their Cameroonian degree in biochemistry, law or engineering qualifies perfectly for either becoming a taxi driver, food seller, hotel cleaner or – if your marks have been really low – to get hired at the government or police, where the salary is ten to a thousand times higher, if you like bribes. There are so many, who don’t like Biya’s great and inflating training opportunities … places where you learn how to take bribes, falsify documents or rip off fellow citizens, flee out of Africa where there are jobs matching better to the qualification. Yes, Biya is really creating a lot of jobs and interaction for youth with Europe. Disregarding of how they are paid and how long they have to suffer in exile because they were incorruptible ... {loadposition myposition} 
   
4.    INVESTMENT IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP
– It’s not the governments that will create all the long-term employment opportunities that are needed, it’s the private sector. So it’s not subsidies that Africa needs so much as more private investment. That means creating an attractive environment within Africa itself. But it also means developing new instruments for
mobilizing and safeguarding investments. That will be topped off by proposals for corporate tax incentives and new investment opportunities, such as Africa funds or infrastructure bonds.

→ Cameroon’s often smiling dictator Paul Biya, who has no grey hair developing out of any worries for “his” people, cannot hear the screams of his tortured opponents and the cries of the thousands of road accident victims each year, while he is far away from all the malady of the ordinary people, hiding in his palace in the capital or in hotel Intercontinental’s king’s suite in Geneva, where nobody disturbs his planning of further beauty surgeries. Yes, this beautiful Paul Biya has always money left over for himself, because he does not see any need to build roads in his country other than where French trucks need to drive oil or timber to French or Chinese ships. Why should he not smile again about the great European incentive to reduce any political criticism on African leaders & governments and let the companies now focus on merely private business, funds and bonds? Good for Biya, that they shall create more and more “attractive environments” exactly where Biya & France want them to be, since the untouched Cameroonian government still stays in control of these private projects, funds and bonds anyway, by sending blackmailing killers to every successfully running business, which doesn’t want to pay the inofficial tax to the government. Yes, there is no reason not to smile or to hinder the Europeans on this reduction of pressure on African regimes, leave alone prosecutions ...
    
5.    VALUE CREATION, NOT EXPLOITATION
– Africa must be more than the continent of raw materials. The Marshall Plan is powered by a new kind of economic policy – one focused on economic diversification, the establishment of production chains, targeted support for agriculture and small and medium-sized businesses, enhanced status for trades and crafts and thus the creation of a new SME sector. Europe needs to support this by offering improved access to the EU single market and dismantling trade barriers.

→ Cameroon’s experienced dictator Paul Biya knows also very well that Africa is much more than the continent of raw materials. He has understood since decades that Africa is also the continent of raw humans, who can be exploited as well. And now with dismantled trade barriers and improved access to (or for?) the EU market, they can be exploited even more in ever more sophisticated production chains and wonderfully crafted new sectors in which the Europeans have the monopoly and no African company can compete. This way Biya can earn double and triple from the French or Chinese corporations, which exploit the cheap labor and super cheap resources in Cameroon, by claiming a double and triple bonus for keeping the salaries low in his land and the access of the non-African monopolies to Cameroon’s resources unhindered, since the Marshall Plan is not saying who owns the resources ….
 
6.    DEMANDING THE RIGHT POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT AND SUPPORTING ITS DEVELOPMENT
– Sustainable economic development is reliant on the rule of law, on both
men and women enjoying political participation and on efficient and non-corrupt administrative structures. Everyone should benefit from economic progress in a country, not just the elites. That is something to be supported and also demanded on a daily basis.

→ Cameroon’s extraordinally sympathetic dictator Paul Biya, who also seems to be a real man, since he killed his first wife and then the father of the twins of his second wife, what the French leaders seem to like about him so very much, since it proves he as a Head of State can really stand above the law and control the judiciary or any constitutional nuisance, which would limit the terms of any Head of State, yes, this manly Paul Biya, who put the chief justice in jail and let bishops kill after their genitals were mutilated, is really full of fear now from this serious threat by the Marshall-Plan to add to the never existing international prosecution of his steady crimes on millions of people now the daily verbal reminder that any administration should be non-corrupt. God beware, if some of his many scapegoat administrator head’s may roll again? Or if another international protest note lands in the drawers of his desk on top of the other thousands of protest notes? Daily verbal reminders! Wow! That is really shaking the fundaments of a totalitarian regime like in Cameroon to the core …
 
7.    REFORM PARTNERSHIPS, NOT A BLANKET APPROACH
– The members of the African Union have committed to specific reforms in their Agenda 2063. We will be taking Africa’s commitments seriously and will step up our development cooperation with those partners who implement reforms aimed at good governance, protection of human rights and economic development.

→ Cameroon’s dictator Paul Biya finally needs to really listen! The Europeans declared seriously that they want to check on the African Union’s specific reforms and select only those countries for preferred partnership who implemented actual reforms. Too bad for Cameroon’s regime now, right, since there is never any reform? At least not too bad for uncle Biya, because he has got this very preferred relationship with France, which guarantees that his decade-long reliable refusal to reform anything will always be highly rewarded. And the Europeans – that is for sure – will never check on France & Françafrique, our dear ally and WW2-winner and money maker out of Africa … , or will they?

8.    EQUITABLE GLOBAL STRUCTURES AND INSTITUTIONS
– Reforms in Africa must also be matched by reforms in Europe and at global level. The main areas are fair trade, combating illicit financial flows and putting a stop to arms sales to areas in crisis. New forms of political cooperation also demand closer cooperation between European and African institutions. That means a permanent seat for the African nations on the United Nations Security Council and an enhanced role in all international organizations and negotiations, such as the
World Trade Organization (WTO).

→ Cameroon’s excellency, highest of the highest, ruler of rulers, pa of all pas, chief all of chiefs, head of state, dictator of everything and arch democrat Paul Biya is impressed and challenged now. The reforms in Africa “must” be matched by reforms in Europe and even by the whole globe. They must. That means as long as they are not really matched they still have to. That duty is not ending until they are all matched everywhere. Wow. That will indeed happen fast then. It is unconditional. It is a “must”. All this must happen. Very soon. It must …. Especially since it is not said, that France “must” also. Because France is sending arms sales to areas in crisis in Africa and nobody cares. A permanent seat for the African nations in the UN Security Council and WTO will certainly give Cameroon a big weight. Among 53 other African nations … that will change everything. “Totally new and closer forms of political cooperation in all international organizations and negotiations.” Wow. Especially when the Marshall Plan didn’t exactly define which kind of reforms, actually …   
 
9.    ODA CANNOT PROVIDE ALL THE ANSWERS
– A lot has been achieved with Official Development Assistance. Yet it cannot cope with the challenges of an entirely new dimension we are facing. ODA should instead serve more to facilitate and promote private investment. African countries themselves must also mobilize considerably more domestic revenues, for example in the form of higher tax receipts.

→ Cameroon’s dictator Paul Biya says thank you! “Higher taxes? Great! My finance minister will transfer me these higher incomes immediately. Very good for my Swiss accounts and for my wife’s shoe shops in Paris! Gives a real push for my salary from the oil wells, where I steal only 1.5 million dollars from my people per day yet!”

10.    WE WILL LEAVE NO ONE BEHIND
– Germany will deliver on its shared responsibility for the least developed countries. The Marshall Plan highlights people’s basic needs: food security, water, energy, infrastructure, digitalization, health care and access to education – particularly for women and girls. We need to acknowledge the opportunities and challenges
presented by urbanization. And, just as much, we need to harness the potential of rural development and agriculture.

→ Cameroon’s beloved, francophile dictator Paul Biya says hi to his beloved Germany, which was so reliable to treat him in private clinics for small peanuts under exclusion of the press and never criticized France for robbing the Cameroonians and never criticized the Cameroonians for annexing the Ambazonians! (Ambazonia is an anglophone country between Cameroon and Nigeria with about 8 million people, which francophone La “Republique” du Cameroun had occupied illegally in 1961 and maltreated and marginalized ever since.) Germany never says a word that France is producing millions of fugitives by the still ongoing French neo-colonialist, exploitative monetary rule over its former colonies in Africa. Thank you Germany, for caring now for the least developed countries in Africa, which could have developed themselves easily, if France, Switzerland, America, China etc. etc. would not support dictators, who rob their countries for their post-colonial masters of the 21st century. Thank you, Marshall-Plan, for wanting good things without bothering us with naming the reasons for the bad things! Thank you, Europe, for not leaving us behind your economic interests!
Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!   




This write-up is partly using the original text of the European MARSHALL PLAN WITH AFRICA, which is downloadable in English, French or German language at
http://www.bmz.de/en/countries_regions/marshall_plan_with_africa/index.html,
as part of a political education project. Everybody is free to forward this write-up to any politician, journalist or organization in the world, preferably to people in the second and third rank of power, because those in the first league don’t listen, but they listen to collective efforts of the second and third leagues. The main purpose of this project is to educate as many people as possible about the necessity to differentiate between the democratic movements and the totalitarian players in Africa in order to make mutually beneficial partnerships between Africa and the World work. The Ambazonia Liberation Movement for example, www.ambazonia.org, is a good example where millions of people, who are well educated and of highest integrity and who live between Nigeria and Cameroon, want nothing else but peace and democracy and a fair share, they so badly need to be supported. But “puppet-holder” Françafrique with its puppet dictators and African-Franc currency controllers in the treasury of Paris is an example of an exploitative, human-rights-violating octopus, which needs to be criticized and forced down, before any good intentions in the Marshall Plan can become a reality. Non-Africans have to be taught to stop the bad habit to throw both the African culprits and the African victims, the freedom destroyers and the freedom fighters, into the same pot and they have to drop the prejudice that all Sub-Saharan Africans would not be able to govern themselves well because of tribalism or corruption. No, how can the true democrats in Africa develop something when Europe is flattering with the Stalins, Hitlers & Pol Pots of Africa? Anyway, the upcoming, better educated generation of African leaders is not only willing but able to govern themselves very well. And they will stop the non-African exploiters of Africa rather sooner than later, because colonialist stealing & robbery has never been legal nor legitimate anywhere in the world. The awakening of the NEW AFRICA is unstoppable and It goes parallel with the NEW EUROPE, which gradually learns, that it is not ruling the world anymore, especially not by the same old methods in new disguise. Nevertheless, the European “Marshall-Plan With Africa” contains some substantial changes in European Africa-policy which we can build on, if the Europeans start supporting the progressive movements and depowering the monetary-economic neo-colonialists.   

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bogus@bogus.com (Christoph Messner) Editorial Tue, 15 Aug 2017 07:58:34 +0000
The Indivisible Nature Of Freedom http://cameroon-concord.com/9057-the-indivisible-nature-of-freedom http://cameroon-concord.com/9057-the-indivisible-nature-of-freedom The Indivisible Nature Of Freedom

Second Letter

The Indivisible Nature of Freedom

“Freedom is indivisible, and when one man is enslaved, all are not free. When all are free, then we can look forward to that day when this city will be joined as one.”{loadposition myposition}

This is an extract of the amazing Berlin speech of President John F Kennedy in which he spoke the words that rocked Berlin and, through it the entire universe: “Ich been ein Berliner”. In fact, he was saying if one person is not free regardless of her/his origin no one can claim to be free. This speech inspired the hash tag “#je suis Charlie Hebdo”, after the barbaric murder perpetrated by terrorists at the office of the French Newspaper Charlie Hebdo. In solidarity with the pain and indignation that gripped Paris and the French, the whole world was one. As a matter of fact President Kennedy was himself inspired by an 18th century report of a series of speeches made by Cicero in 70 BC. By simply stating “civis rumanus sum” the Latin phrase for “I am a Roman citizen” one could lay a claim to the right for the same protection as the Roman Citizen.

So, when my learned colleagues described to me what happened during the last hearing in the Yaounde Military Tribunal of July 29, 2017, in the case of Agbor Bala, Dr. Fontem, Mancho Bibixy and others, I was greatly saddened and troubled. Saddened and troubled because, it could have been you or I, not because we are Anglophones or Francophones, but because we are supposed to be citizens of the same country. This is a trial in which all the accused persons are Anglophones and all those judging and prosecuting are Francophones. Two courageous high ranking gentlemen in uniform, knowing the potential consequences of not conforming and in defiance of any threat they could face from the powers that be, told the truth and affirmed not to have seen the persons in court commit any of the acts of violence that supposedly took place, and of which the defendants were accused. These star witnesses opening the famous case therefore provided statements and seen these citizens set free. But no, they are still in prison.

They are incarcerated for seeking their rights, and peacefully asking for better conditions for their professions and a better life for all. They did so by proclaiming their citizenship – citizenship, which they believed, afforded them the right to freedom of expression, the right to protection and a guaranteed solution to their grievances. Instead, they met with unparalleled repression, arrests, relocation and a trial that has taken eight months just to start, with no end in sight.

Instead of being the citizens they wanted to be, they are now being called Anglophones, terrorists and secessionists. Any other Cameroonian be they Francophone or Anglophone could have raised the issue of injustice and bad governance. It is one that is becoming pervasive throughout our society. You and I are out free. It is because we have resigned ourselves to the current state of affairs. We have come to accept that it is proper for some to embezzle public funds and not be called to account, for some to abuse of their powers and engage in the crudest form of nepotism, all the while lecturing others about the love of country and attempting to distract us from this reality and attempting to divide us through branding and labeling. Even the courageous prosecutor in the Military Tribunal who had followed the case from the beginning found himself transferred to Ebolowa. Is it because he refused to oppose bail? Is it because he paid special attention to the procedure code? This code, which guarantees your rights and my rights?

Freedom is indivisible. We cannot pretend to enjoy any freedom when our fellow citizens are incarcerated unjustly. Justice Ayah Paul, of the highest jurisdiction of our land, a secondary school classmate of mine (known in school in the most premonitory manner as “the incorruptible judge” after a school play in which he was the judge- we were only 16 years old then) will have just gone past 200 days of detention. We still have to find out, why. Many Cameroonians Anglophone and Francophone, many of the respectable leaders in our society, Bar Leaders from many countries, the United Nations many, the international Crisis Group, the African Union and several others, have pleaded for these victims who are fighting for our freedom to be set free.

A Cleric in his sermon at the funeral service for Bishop Jean Marie Bala (another mystery of our country) had this to say. “True power is not violent, true power constructs peace, true power builds the development of the wholesome nature of the human being”. In this poignant homily, Reverend Father Joseph Akonga Essomba says, in this life, there are those who will be considered as being mad just because they are not worrying about themselves but about the importance of their mission here on earth. Is this why those who fight for our freedoms and well being are branded terrorists? Are there some people who feel threatened and terrified by the truth?

My Francophone sisters and brothers I say this. We must now proclaim the indivisible nature of freedom. As a nation we are you and you are we. I have no problem saying I am francophone if it means identifying myself with what is right and what contributes to the building of our nation.

Let all the francophones who read this take to their social media accounts and proclaim the unifying message in this time of crisis: “I am Anglophone”. This message will confound and threaten all those who wish to divide us for their own selfish purposes. Even beyond your social media, let your neighbors, your colleagues, your classmates, and other acquaintances, know that you stand with them in opposition to injustice and you will be steadfast in defending their rights.

Yes, you must proclaim it “ I am Anglophone” and you will thus in the words of the Rev. Father Akonga be negating the answer of Cain, of the Bible, to the voice that asked him where was his brother Abel. Cain answered, “am I my brother’s keeper? Yes we are! Affirmed the Rev. Father with vehemence, “ we are brothers’ keepers” That is why the enslavement of one of us is the enslavement of all. Freedom is indeed indivisible. Each and everyone should affirm, “ I am Anglophone” So we can all be called terrorists even if that is the prize we have to pay to salvage our nation. Epictetus the Greek Philosopher said something we might as well reflect upon “No man is free who is not master of himself” That is what Cameroonians need now. Freedom that allows them to be themselves. One that respects their diversity and makes of it a unique form of richness. One that gives them equal opportunity and equality before the law. One that rewards hard work and integrity and refuses impunity. One that will cause them to able scream proudly: “this is Cameroon, my homeland my dear fatherland!”

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Akere Muna
@AkereMuna
#Cameroon

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bogus@bogus.com (Akere Muna) Editorial Sat, 12 Aug 2017 16:48:57 +0000
THINGS FALL APART… HOW DO WE START HEALING ? http://cameroon-concord.com/9056-things-fall-apart-how-do-we-start-healing http://cameroon-concord.com/9056-things-fall-apart-how-do-we-start-healing THINGS FALL APART… HOW DO WE START HEALING ?

urning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world...

It is in these terms that Chinua Achebe starts his epic novel, Things Fall Apart, written in 1958. It is, in fact, an excerpt of the poem by W.B. Yates, “The Second Coming”. Chinua Achebe’s novel is more or less about the transition from colonial Nigeria to independence, viewed through the life of Okonkwo, an Igbo wrestler.

Cameroon is itself at the crossroads of a transition and, whether we accept it or not, the signs are glaring. A population, of which 70% is under 30 years and worried about its tomorrow, is slowly choking under the stranglehold of a group of oligarchs whose only worry is about today and their self-preservation, totally oblivious to the inevitable nature of change: that today is tomorrow’s yesterday, and tomorrow always comes.

The scary fact is that, in less than a year, those who govern us have effectively leveraged the diversity of Cameroon into a tool divide our nation. By preventing citizens – Common Law lawyers and Anglophone teachers – from exercising the basic right to demonstrate which is enshrined in our Constitution, they set off a spark and today, months later, we find ourselves in a situation where things seem to be falling apart. We are now divided between secessionists, federalists and those seeking decentralization. We are divided between Francophones and Anglophones. We are divided between North Westerners and South Westerners. We are divided between Bamilekes and Betis. We are even divided between Ewondos, Bulus and Etons; between the Bamouns and the Bamilekes. The non-homogenous nature of regions makes them tailor ready for division. You find the Mbam in the Centre Region, the Bassa in the central region, people of the Sawa origin in the southern region, people of Sancho in the Menoua Western, and so on. Muslims and Christians in the north live together as one and seeds of discord are sown at convenience. The list goes on. This is the delicate balance on which our country sits. If we are to survive and thrive, we must listen to each other and constantly engage in honest dialogue about the future of Cameroon. Any form of arrogance and reckless discrimination, regardless of the nature, instigator or perpetrator, can only threaten this delicate balance.

The visit of the prelate from Douala who is the head of the Episcopal Conference was either ill-advised or ill-conceived, or maybe even both. So here we are; the church that was the rock and only survivor of this quagmire with the chance to be a moral voice and a strong mediator is now weakened by the perception that it too is now divided. The “Eglise Evangelique” has also gotten its taste of the virus of division favored by a climate in which we now tend to concentrate on what divides us than on what we have in common. The Bishop of Bafia was found dead on the shores of the River Sanaga, a couple of days after his car was found on the Ebebda Bridge over the Sanaga. The strange thesis of suicide was immediately proclaimed even before the body was found. Now it is clear from the declaration of the Episcopal Conference, that the venerated Bishop was the victim of a callous crime. So, whither are we bound?

As regards what is now known as the “Anglophone Problem” (I always use this appellation with hesitation because I have never understood whether it means the Anglophones have a problem, or that Anglophones constitute a problem, and if so for whom?) certain measures have been announced as an answer to the complaints that were put forward by the teachers and lawyers. The simple fact is that an academic year has been lost, lawyers are still on strike, many Anglophones have been forced to escape into exile and others remain in prison. Internet that was disconnected was brought back after 93 days and an outcry that was echoed over the whole world against such a collective form of punishment. We emerged from the saga with a world record of the longest-running Internet blackout – a record in which some have taken pride as proof of power, with some even expecting the deprived regions to feel grateful for the reconnection.

Anglophone prelates from all the oldest churches of Cameroon (Baptist, Catholic and Presbyterian Churches) have now been dragged to court. An unfortunate atmosphere has been created in which being an Anglophone now constitutes the first indices of being a secessionist, a troublemaker or a potential terrorist. I speak with the certainty of one of those who have been so classified. That is what it has come to, for those who worry for the country, seek equality equity and dialogue. That is what it has come to, a situation in which, when one makes concrete proposals after factual and reasoned analysis of the facts, one can be branded a potential enemy of the nation. If the ever-increasing trend of bad governance is not reversed very soon, we will wake up in a country that none of us recognize. The first step will be to reverse certain unfortunate results of the knee-jerk approach we have had in response to the outcry of our Cameroonian brothers and sisters. National healing is the primary guarantee for national dialogue.

So what should we do to start the healing?

On the Matter of Ongoing Criminal Proceedings:
It is generally accepted that the release of all those arrested will boost the goodwill and pave the way to dialogue. The law actually allows for this. As regards the detainees and the different trials going on in the Military Tribunal Regions as well in the courts in the Anglophone regions, against citizens, clerics and prelates, it is important to recall the provisions of Article 64 (1) of the Criminal Procedure Code which states:

“The Procureur General of a Court of Appeal may, by express authority of the Ministry in Charge of Justice, enter a nolle prosequi, at any stage before judgment on the merits is delivered, if such proceedings could seriously imperil social interest or public order.”

This provision of the law describes the exact situation we are in. It is applicable to the ordinary courts. An equivalent provision exists for the proceedings instituted before the Military Jurisdictions. This is section 12 of the Law No.2008 of December 2008 Organizing Military Justice Anyone talking about peace and reconciliation in good faith should immediately resort to these provision, to put a halt to the current situation, which is accelerating the country’s glide towards division and conflict. I remember assisting my brother, Batonnier Bernard Muna, in drafting the Amnesty Law that was proposed to the then Secretary General of the Presidency of the Republic of Cameroon, Mr. Sadou Hayatou, for the attention of the Head of State. It was sent to Parliament and adopted in the interest of peace and reconciliation. A telex message was even sent from the Presidency congratulating Bernard for his patriotic spirit. Today, here we are, Cameroonians, asking for this. International organisations and NGOs have joined the chorus. We should heed these calls and save our nation from further division. Those who sought refuge in arrogance and repression must certainly realize that this is choking the country.

On the Matter of Common Law Magistrates and Judges:
I have read that a Common Law section has been opened at the School of Magistracy and that exams will be scheduled. It is good that concrete solutions are being proposed, but we can and should go further than that. The above action will take at least four years to start producing results. The law does already provide us with a solution that that will produce almost immediate results and cause us to start conforming not only to the Common Law training but also to the Common law culture and tradition: Section 14 of Decree No. 2004/080 from the 13th of April 2004, lays down a procedure for lawyers and other categories of trained jurists to be integrated in to the Magistracy at different grades depending on their years of experience. This is the Common Law tradition. Some lawyers with revered experience and with reputations for moral rectitude could be selected to become judges.

Not only would this provide an almost immediate solution, but also, it would be applying the Common Law tradition whereby a large number of members of the judiciary are recruited from the private Bar. To date only one person seems to have benefited from this tradition. That is the late Chief SML Endeley who started out as a Barrister before becoming the Chief Justice of West Cameroon. A reminder of this fact was the strong showing of the Bar at his historic funeral in Buea.

In a country where there is a total lack of trust towards a government that is long on promises and short on delivery, there are many who do not see any of the proposed measures bearing fruit anytime soon. Instead, they are viewed as yet another ruse – another dilatory tactic. Decentralization is contained in the 1996 Constitution, and over twenty years later, the Regions yet have to elect a President. A measure that was promoted as the equivalent of a federation in 1996 has since 2004 been watered down to a structure in which elected officials are under the control of political appointees. Even in that watered down form, 13 years after, nothing has happened. I am afraid that in the present climate, any attempt at decentralization under the current legal framework will not address any of the substantial issues that are now being raised.{loadposition myposition}

On the Matter of the Lost Academic Year:
If all the measures outlined above implemented, to show the government’s good faith in addressing the issues at hand, further steps can then be taken to address the interrupted school year. Specifically, intensive courses could be offered over the long vacation, along with a special second session of all the exams that have been disrupted. The start of the next academic year may even be slightly delayed, but we would have gone a long way in making amends. I hear there is an African proverb which says “when an adult falls, he stand up looks back; and when a child falls, he stands up looks forward”. The way to peace, dialogue and unity cannot be paved by the arrogant use of power and retributive justice. Even after 27 years of suffering, Mandela harnessed the wrath of a downtrodden people, who had witnessed the subjugation and murder of their own by an imperious few on the basis of race. In this present juncture the powers that be, have to decide on which side of history they choose to take their place.

I will conclude with a few lines on the Commission for Bilingualism and Multiculturalism. The biggest problem in policy nowadays is enforcement. Given this fact, anytime an institution is created with only advisory prerogatives, we might as well forget about the capacity of such an institution to be a tool to assist in the resolution of pressing issues. The Committee will have to provide advice, which can be accepted or rejected. Even if such advice is acquiesced, it must be followed by policy development, which in turn would need to be implemented effectively. If we are taking over 21 years, and still counting, to implement settled Constitutional provisions, we are kidding ourselves when we point to this Commission as the solution to any of the current issues. If you add to this equation the nature of its mandate, then we might just begin to understand the nature of the farce.

The time wasted weaving this web of division in which we unfortunately find ourselves distracts us from other seething issues that must be considered with the same amount of urgency.

First among these is the problem of the management of landed property in our country. The preamble of our constitution affirms, “The State shall ensure the protection of minorities and shall preserve the rights of indigenous populations in accordance with the law”; we should remember that according to article 65 of the same constitution, the preamble is part of the constitution.
The opacity in which the mining of minerals is managed in the Eastern Region of Cameroon in total absence of any discernable governance principles is saddening. The consequence of this on the lives of the “indigenous population” will come to haunt us. The management of lands in Kribi is not accompanied by any policy that is aimed at protecting the indigenous populations. The management of the returned land in Fako from the CDC to the rightful indigenous population is fraught with all manner of mismanagement. In the Extreme North a war is raging on perpetrated by a group of terrorists and bandits attempting to pass for religious fanatics. All international assessments have concluded that, the dire economic situation of the population has exposed them and they have fallen prey to the enticements and threats from these charlatans who unsuccessfully try to hide under the cover of a respectable religion.

As we tread forward, we must be ignited again by the spirit of a time when our country was poised for true greatness and distinction, not in spite of our differences, but precisely because of them. A time when the synthesis of Anglophone and Francophone cultures meant that we would be able to draw on the best of both parts. A time when we were convinced that we would be more competitive on the global stage because we could do business in the world’s major languages. A time when we knew that, even through our music, we would be able to appeal to many more. To borrow words from one of our founding fathers, Um Nyobe (also at a time when Cameroon was at a crossroads), the first step in moving Cameroon forward is by actively combating tribalism, and creating a system that is based on the best each of us have to offer. It is time for better governance that is in tune with the ideas and solutions proposed by those who love this country, and not one that seeks to silence the voices that disagree with the status quo. It is never too late to do the right thing.

In Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart”, he makes a savvy use of proverbs from the Igbo people. One that comes to mind is: "the lizard that jumped from the high Iroko tree to the ground said he would praise himself if no one else did”. Like the lizard, some are marching all over the country, monopolizing the public media in self-praise, while everyone else watches in complete stupefaction. They see that the center can no longer hold because things are falling apart. However, it is not too late to change our course.

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bogus@bogus.com (Akere Muna) Editorial Fri, 11 Aug 2017 14:57:40 +0000
THE SDF AND CPDM: AGENTS OF COLONISATION AND ASSIMILATION http://cameroon-concord.com/9039-the-sdf-and-cpdm-agents-of-colonisation-and-assimilation http://cameroon-concord.com/9039-the-sdf-and-cpdm-agents-of-colonisation-and-assimilation THE SDF AND CPDM: AGENTS OF COLONISATION AND ASSIMILATION

I want us to understand the role political parties registered under Republique’s laws play in our struggle. We have lightly touched on it, but we did not go deep enough to allow us to see that these parties are the real underlying enemies to our freedom. Through our participation in them, we stand in direct contradiction to our struggle and our words!

If we can understand their role and disengage from them, we are bound to be free. Refusing to participate in all political parties operating in Republique du Cameroun is key to our freedom. In other countries such as Canada, the law allows parties to be created in Quebec whose goal is the sovereign independence of Quebec, as for the example, the Parti Quebecois. In Britain, the law also allows Scotland to have its national parties whose purpose is to restore their independence. In imperial Cameroun, their leaders, who have setup themselves as the gods of the Southern Cameroons, forbid the creation of any party whose goal is the restoration of the independence of the Southern Cameroons. They are, of course conscious of their illegal occupation and dread the fact that allowing such a party would see the independence of the Southern Cameroons even in its first year of operation. All other parties which help its colonisation and assimilation are registered as a matter of course. These include the SDF and the CPDM, the two parties in which most Southern Cameroonians find themselves.

We are not speaking as if we are all nationalists. I do understand that there are some amongst Southern Cameroonians who say they want federation. They call themselves federalists. But within the context of current international law, what is the foundation of a federation between the Southern Cameroons and Republique du Cameroun, considering in particular the mountain of evidence supporting Southern Cameroons independence? What is the case for federation? They say they have been forced into submission by Republique du Cameroun’s threat of war if we ask for independence! These are those who continue to cling to political parties operating under Republique’s laws. But we can predict that their own children will grow up and question their federation, just as we, who were still children, have grown up to question the fraudulent relation, not even “union”, between the Southern Cameroons and Republique du Cameroun. As I have explained time and again, there is absolutely no one-Cameroon formula in which the people of Southern Cameroons can have a space of existence of their own. No good laws can cure the situation, because we are dealing simply with a game of numbers. If you form any form of federation, it would be only a matter of time before you discover that federation cannot cure the fundamental problem, which is that of the people of the Southern Cameroons being overwhelmed by an alien and foreign people, whose alien ways will inevitably suppress those of the People of the Southern Cameroons! You will discover that you will not have any backyard of your own; that in every class room you would be a minority; that your language would be replaced by a foreign language; that in your own towns, you would become a minority and mere spectator, and so on. Check what is happening in Quebec. When you finally understand that we are dealing merely with a game of numbers, you will see the futility of any other option but total independence! You will cling firmly to nothing but sovereign independence, because that is the single and sole protection you have, if you want to have a space of existence of your own!{loadposition myposition}
 
For those who rightly believe in independence as a right, I wish to explain the contradiction in which we find ourselves. On the one hand we say we want freedom and independence; on the other hand, we are promoting the annexation of our territory by joining the political parties operating under Republique du Cameroun’s laws.

How can we get freedom when we have used our participation in Republique’s political parties to accept that we are one country? How? Our action of participating in their political parties is an absolute contradiction to our claims to independence! I want us to see what we are doing to ourselves!!! Here, our actions are speaking louder than our words!

Further, I want us to see that our participation is voluntary, not forced! No one comes to your house to force you to belong to any political party. If we accept that our participation in Republique’s parties is voluntary, then we accept that we have the power to refuse to participate in those parties.

Nothing holds the Southern Cameroons down today more than our participation in the political parties of Republique du Cameroun. We have crippled ourselves with that participation! In this, the SDF is even more dangerous to our aspiration of independence than the CPDM, because some of our people may still have a soft spot for it. Fru Ndi, having become a prisoner of the system, will constantly talk of federation, because he has no option. By doing this, he divides the mind of our people and creates confusion. Our people feel a certain attachment to the SDF because of the memories of the suffering they went through in creating it and what they have suffered in it. But the truth is also that all that suffering has been in vain as far as the restoration of the independence of the Southern Cameroons is concerned. The CPDM, on its part, is likely to die with Biya, but because it is in power, you will always find those who crawl on the ground to pick the crumbs. These two parties therefore present the greatest threat to our struggle because a good portion of our people are in them.

We must now choose whether those parties are more important to us or the sovereign independence of our own country, the Southern Cameroons. We must choose whether we want to continue to be slaves of Republique du Cameroun or free people in our own homeland where we will be free to become the president if we want.

We cannot be crying for freedom, when we hold the keys in our hands; when we ourselves have locked up the door to freedom through our participation in the politics of Republique du Cameroun. Let us understand the terrible contradiction in which we put ourselves and quickly take steps to cause all our people to withdraw from these parties.

What is even more shocking is that there is absolutely nothing to show for all that useless party politics in Republique du Cameroun. It is all corruption, nepotism, bribery and confusion. Why should our people continue to go dancing in the rain and sun when what they are doing cannot contribute in the least way to their welfare? Why? We can only conclude that it is all the result of brainwashing and the falsehood in which our people have been living.

1.    When you join parties registered under Republique du Cameroun’s laws, you are made to fly its flag, sing its anthem, compete for power within Republique du Cameroun; honour its symbols and emblems; show patriotism to Republique! Yet, by aspiring for our own independence, we want to fly the Southern Cameroons flag, not that of Republique; we want to sing the Southern Cameroons anthem; honour its symbols, and reject everything that belongs to Republique du Cameroun! Today, the truth has been exposed, and all our people can see the falsehood in which they have been living. They have been flyging the flag, singing the anthem and honouring the symbols of their oppressor and colonizer, hiding in sheep’s clothing. When shall we stop the folly?  Above all you grant Republique a right within the Southern Cameroons merely through that participation.  

2.    Through our participation in Republique’s political parties, we enable Republique to create One National Assembly and One Government with the Southern Cameroons. It is this One Government and One National Assembly which is the final proof Republique offers to the world that the Southern Cameroons and Republique du Cameroun are one country!!!

3.    Through our participation in those parties, we voluntarily give Republique du Cameroun an alibi and proof to show the world that we are one country. If we say we are not one country, all we have to do is refuse to participate in its political parties!!!

4.    Our participation in the political parties of Republique du Cameroun helps to accomplish the agenda of the assimilation and dissolution of the Southern Cameroons in Republique du Cameroun. By joining those political parties, we are actually assisting Republique du Cameroun in its assimilation agenda. How? Because our participation forbids us from asking questions about its illegal occupation of our territory! If we want to restore our identity and sovereignty, we must refuse to participate in those parties.

5.    It is our participation in Republique’s politics that permits it to sit our MPs in its parliament and fill other colonial positions from MPs to Mayors, thus claiming that we are fully represented through our democratic participation. We must reject all of this by withdrawing from those parties! We have been asking our MPs to withdraw. Ok. But we can achieve the same goal by asking all our people to withdraw from all political parties operating in Republique. This is not only possible, but the easiest thing for us to do if we do not want war and bloodshed!

6.    Through those parties, we are barred from raising issues which are specific or peculiar to the Southern Cameroons. We are forced to be constantly talking about general or so-called national issues and therefore suppressing our own problems; in short to be agents of the assimilation!

7.    Through our participation, we sit our MPs in their parliament, where they have no voice; they are constantly in the minority; they cannot raise any issue relating to their people; where they are simply providing an alibi for the stealing of our resources and for our unconscious assimilation. NO! NO! NO! We have seen it all!

8.    Through those parties you cannot question the legality of Republique’s presence in the Southern Cameroons; you cannot challenge Republique’s annexation of the Southern Cameroons; you cannot ask Republique to show the proof which gives it jurisdiction in the Southern Cameroons. By our participation, we have terribly compromised ourselves! We have through those parties denied ourselves the possibility of even speaking as a people! If we are to question these things, we must first quit all political parties operating in Republique du Cameroun!

Countrymen, we can elaborate this aberration even further, but I believe we all see it clearly now. Let us all wage the campaign to get our people withdraw from these parties. This is the most important campaign we have to do. This, in short, is the real and final battle.

The first thing we should do is ask all our people to burn all those party cards and uniforms. They should all refuse to participate in the politics of Republique du Cameroun! After that, we ban all political activities within our territory until independence.

Atemnkeng.

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bogus@bogus.com (Concord Essen) Editorial Mon, 07 Aug 2017 10:11:50 +0000
Reasons why Cameroon's missions abroad will fail http://cameroon-concord.com/9032-reasons-why-cameroon-s-missions-abroad-will-fail http://cameroon-concord.com/9032-reasons-why-cameroon-s-missions-abroad-will-fail Reasons why Cameroon's missions abroad will fail


The govt of Cameroun only woke up a couple of days ago to discover that the people of the former British Southern Cameroons have made huge diplomatic gains towards the restoration of their independence.
Accordingly, they have embarked on a fight back move by sending surrogates to several countries in the world. All former ministers, directors, and even business men are abroad now trying to undo these huge gains. Danpullo had to cover Senegal, Guinea and neighbouring countries. Laurent Esso to cover western Europe,  the Ghoghomou delegation to cover the Americas and the UN etc etc. {loadposition myposition} 


These missions will fail woefully firstly because the govt has shown bad faith in handling the crises. The continuous arrests and detention of leaders despite calls from international bodies to release them has put the regime's image in the blacklist of the international community.
Secondly, a lot of awareness has been created on the Southern Cameroons issue so no amount of lies telling can undo this.


Thirdly the surrogates themselves are corrupt so even the money given to be used for "diplomatic" purposes will be swindled.
Besides, so many countries are now in favour of restoration of independence. The people have left Egypt and Pharaoh has sent his soldiers to bring them back. Have no fear. Use ur eyes of faith to see the pillar of cloud and fire preventing them from catching up.
To make matters worse there is an official US Senate briefing tomorrow on this crises with a powerful team in place to push through and official Senate statement recognising the independence of the southern Cameroons. This will end the game. {loadposition myposition2} 

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bogus@bogus.com (Neba Nathan) Editorial Sat, 05 Aug 2017 16:56:19 +0000
Corruption: The gene that can't be edited in Cameroon http://cameroon-concord.com/8989-corruption-the-gene-that-can-t-be-edited-in-cameroon http://cameroon-concord.com/8989-corruption-the-gene-that-can-t-be-edited-in-cameroon Corruption: The gene that can't be edited in Cameroon

If corruption were a disease in Cameroon, we may never find a cure for it. We have grown to love it as the body needs blood.

And what is more shocking is the fact that this is happening right under the nose of so-called anticorruption commission CONAC.

I was travelling on Saturday from Yaoundé to Bamenda on board a seventy-seater Amour Mezam bus when a glaring case of corruption hit me right on the chest.{loadposition myposition} 

As we neared entering Bamenda, a certain 'doctor' stood and warned that anyone without the National Identify Card should inform the driver before we ever got to the last  checkpoint.
Two persons raised their hands.
When the bus drove up to the checkpoint, the conductor came over and collected FCFA 500 from each of the two guys.
The rest of the passengers walked down and presented their cards.
But the men in uniform at the checkpoint rejected the money, as if they didn't want to be corrupted.
But little did we know that they wanted and increase.
One if the two victims suggested they wanted the amount doubled. And when they did, the money was collected quietly.
And the journey continued.
The question I ask myself is: What is the reason for that 'strict' checking when nothing changes after all?
If it were to prevent criminals from travelling with good people, why then would they let those 'criminals' go through?
Or is it just another way of helping greedy uniform men and women to squeeze the last penny out of the feeble hands of the needy?{loadposition myposition2} 

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bogus@bogus.com (Concord Essen) Editorial Sat, 29 Jul 2017 17:28:39 +0000
An Empowering Ode to the Interim President Of Southern Cameroons: Mr. Julius Ayuk Tabe http://cameroon-concord.com/8911-an-empowering-ode-to-the-interim-president-of-southern-cameroons-mr-julius-ayuk-tabe http://cameroon-concord.com/8911-an-empowering-ode-to-the-interim-president-of-southern-cameroons-mr-julius-ayuk-tabe An Empowering Ode to the Interim President Of Southern Cameroons: Mr. Julius Ayuk Tabe

 PREVAIL

Prevail in the pitch darkness of tempestuous nights

As the incandescent lighthouse emits its radiance From the distant horizon whereof sea monsters Team up and swim offshore in violent splashes Amidst vexing cataracts and hurricanes. Prevail through thick and thin Across the narrow path of the wild Overladen with weaving weeds, thickening thorns And dreadful deeps of antiquity Harbouring sundry reptiles in mangrove swamps.

Prevail while in their sacred sanctuaries, Pseudo-prelates pray for you with concealed pretence After eating the bread of the heathen, Drinking the wine of the desecrated vineyard And putting on the gabardine of the damned. Prevail with leaps and bounds Where greed and treachery have failed to deliver the goods For the welfare and wellbeing Of your disillusioned denizens Who will for nothing else than their freedom sacrifice their lives. Prevail while that grandfather in Ekondo-Titi Majestically inhales stuffy snuff into his sunken nostrils And that grandmother in Acha-Tugi Proudly puffs serpentine fumes from her age-battered pipe As they impatiently await the wake of October. {loadposition myposition}

Prevail at God speed, mindful that More than eight million Southern Cameroons people Count on this trying transitional period More than any journey on which they have ever embarked, And more than any project which they have ever engaged. Prevail while our predecessors in their endless sleep In home and overseas sepulchres speak in unison For the restoration of our independence Whereof our children and their children's children Shall harvest their livelihood till time incalculable. Prevail while your energy is still at its peak, For the race of life is short, And the chosen have just a dash To accomplish their lifelong tasks For which they are assigned from their births. Prevail while the world at large marvels And historians chronicle that you were the interim torchbearer Of an independent nation once enslaved for fifty-six years Now emerging as one of the English-speaking countries On the tropics of the African continent to be reckoned with.

Prevail while from their heavenly dominions, The Angels in their immaculate white chariots, Sing the eternal glory of God For sending an illustrious son of your sanity To come to the timely rescue of a subjugated people. Prevail while I sit painfully in my termite-hued cubicle And compose a line or two from my overflowing fountain For the exaltation of this glaring galore on our doorsteps, For it is the divine calling of a studious artisan of my fidelity.

Nkwetatang Sampson Nguekie CEO, Library of Writers & Readers Global Lebialem County, Southern Cameroons.{loadposition myposition2}

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bogus@bogus.com (Nkwetatang Sampson Nguekie) Editorial Mon, 17 Jul 2017 09:28:47 +0000
Rev. Fr. Kebei Jervis Cautions Boh Herbert http://cameroon-concord.com/8860-rev-fr-kebei-jervis-cautions-boh-herbert http://cameroon-concord.com/8860-rev-fr-kebei-jervis-cautions-boh-herbert Rev. Fr. Kebei Jervis Cautions Boh Herbert

It is true that we are all in the struggle for the good of p Anglophone Cameroonians, but in the course of this “la Lotta continua” it is unacceptable-that we lose the very values in which we the West Cameroonians were formed and brought up and which we are struggling by this very struggle to reestablish.This is the value of respect for elders and men of God. Mr. Boh Herbert who is now insulting the Bishops of the Bamenda Ecclesiastical Province, is a product of Catholic Education, at least from Primary school to secondary school. He did not just go to any secondary school but went to Bishop Rogan College Buea which is a minor seminary, and thus he had nursed the intention to become aCatholic Priest at some point in time. More so, Boh Herbert went to Bishop Rogan college at the time that many of the boys from the villages could hardly pay fees and the missionaries either paid for them or let them study for free. It is a shame that today, it is Boh Herbert, who would record his voice not only to challenge but insinuate insults on Bishops, who are men of God and successors of the Apostles. That voice clip will remain in history and Boh’s children will listen to it and be ashamed of their father, and his own father will turn in his grave in shame of his son. Mr. Boh cannot claim that he loves West Cameroonmore than any of the Bishops and what the Bishops have done in this struggle for justice to be established among the people of West Cameroon, Mr. Boh has not done and cannot do. The Bishops who are our spiritual fathers look at the global picture for the common good of our people and above all for our children. Mr. Boh sits in the United States of America and thinks that he can take hostage all Anglophone children and turn them into illiterates and use them as bullets for the struggle. Herbert is living out of context and thus he does not even know the realities on the ground. Generals command war from the battle ground and not from some hiding place where they are completely safe and they are instructing foot soldiers on which direction the fight should go. Boh should follow the example of our hero Hon. Joe Wirba and come back and stand up tobe counted and he will be a real commander. There are people who in the course of struggling in this fight in either camps, have lost their reasoning and they risk incurring curses upon themselves and upon their subsequent generations. Some of these include Paul Atanga Nji,Ekema Patrick, Okalia Bilai, Achu Julius and now Boh Herbert is struggling to join their ranks. Why do I say so?{loadposition myposition}
Mr. Boh, if you went to Bishop Rogan college, it means that you have abit of knowledge of the Scriptures. The Scriptures say, “Do no touch my anointed ones; do my prophets no harm” (Ps.105:15) and I advice you to follow the wisdom of David who had the occasion to molest and kill King Saul,but he instead told his men, “The Lord forbid that I should do this to my Lord the King and attack the Lord’s anointed one, for the Lord himself has chosen him”.(I Samuel 24:6) What you are doing Mr. Boh is that you are behaving exactly like the authorities of La Republique du Cameroun, by forcing your opinion and your will on others and thanks you have no army, you would have been worse in brutalizing citizens more than the colonial masters you are seeking to expel from our territory. La Republique du Cameroun thinks that bishops are nobodies and because they are the moral voice of the Anglophone Cameroonians, they have to smear dung on them and disgrace them, and that is why they are in courts with criminal charges on their heads, brought by agents of LRC. You are doing exactly the same, although your own court to which you have dragged the bishops is the social media. The Bishopric is a divine institution and no matter the foolishness and weakness of those who carry it, they are chosen men of God and deserve respect. Even if the bishops took a foolish decision, it is not you, a born and brought up Catholic, that will go to the social media and think that you can disgrace them. You act exactly like Okwonkwo in Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart” who thought that he would be considered a hero if he killed his own son. Go and read Genesis 9:22 and see the curse that came upon the man who saw his father’s nakedness and started laughing and invited the others to come and see, instead of getting a loin cloth to cover his father. That is the risk you are running Mr. Boh. Above everything, if after all the church has done for you. Mr Boh, you can turn around and insinuate that the Bishops are fools,unreasonable, etc, then know that these words are for you: "But I say to you that everyone who is angry with his brother shall be guilty before the court; and whoever says to his brother, 'You good-for-nothing,' shall be guilty before the supreme court; and whoever says, 'You fool,' shall be guilty enough to go into the fiery hell.” Mtt.5:22. I hope this write up will put an end to this rubbish that anybody thinks that LRC has set them the standard to get up from their sleep and insult our bishops and try to treat them like small children and unreasonable rascals. This is not the moral formation we received in our days in West Cameroon and it is not the behavior we want our children in the Anglophone territory to copy. Bishops have said that schools should begin in September 2017 and schools will begin. But “La lotta continua”.{loadposition myposition2}

 

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bogus@bogus.com (Concord Essen) Editorial Thu, 13 Jul 2017 06:03:14 +0000
AKERE MUNA HITS AGAIN!! "THINGS FALL APART… HOW DO WE START HEALING ?" http://cameroon-concord.com/8783-akere-muna-hits-again-things-fall-apart-how-do-we-start-healing http://cameroon-concord.com/8783-akere-muna-hits-again-things-fall-apart-how-do-we-start-healing AKERE MUNA HITS AGAIN!!

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world...

It is in these terms that Chinua Achebe starts his epic novel, Things Fall Apart, written in 1958. It is, in fact, an excerpt of the poem by W.B. Yates, “The Second Coming”. Chinua Achebe’s novel is more or less about the transition from colonial Nigeria to independence, viewed through the life of Okonkwo, an Igbo wrestler.

Cameroon is itself at the crossroads of a transition and, whether we accept it or not, the signs are glaring. A population, of which 70% is under 30 years and worried about its tomorrow, is slowly choking under the stranglehold of a group of oligarchs whose only worry is about today and their self-preservation, totally oblivious to the inevitable nature of change: that today is tomorrow’s yesterday, and tomorrow always comes.

The scary fact is that, in less than a year, those who govern us have effectively leveraged the diversity of Cameroon into a tool divide our nation. By preventing citizens – Common Law lawyers and Anglophone teachers – from exercising the basic right to demonstrate which is enshrined in our Constitution, they set off a spark and today, months later, we find ourselves in a situation where things seem to be falling apart. We are now divided between secessionists, federalists and those seeking decentralization. We are divided between Francophones and Anglophones. We are divided between North Westerners and South Westerners. We are divided between Bamilekes and Betis. We are even divided between Ewondos, Bulus and Etons; between the Bamouns and the Bamilekes. The non-homogenous nature of regions makes them tailor ready for division. You find the Mbam in the Centre Region, the Bassa in the central region, people of the Sawa origin in the southern region, people of Sancho in the Menoua Western, and so on. Muslims and Christians in the north live together as one and seeds of discord are sown at convenience. The list goes on. This is the delicate balance on which our country sits. If we are to survive and thrive, we must listen to each other and constantly engage in honest dialogue about the future of Cameroon. Any form of arrogance and reckless discrimination, regardless of the nature, instigator or perpetrator, can only threaten this delicate balance.

The visit of the prelate from Douala who is the head of the Episcopal Conference was either ill-advised or ill-conceived, or maybe even both. So here we are; the church that was the rock and only survivor of this quagmire with the chance to be a moral voice and a strong mediator is now weakened by the perception that it too is now divided. The “Eglise Evangelique” has also gotten its taste of the virus of division favored by a climate in which we now tend to concentrate on what divides us than on what we have in common. The Bishop of Bafia was found dead on the shores of the River Sanaga, a couple of days after his car was found on the Ebebda Bridge over the Sanaga. The strange thesis of suicide was immediately proclaimed even before the body was found. Now it is clear from the declaration of the Episcopal Conference, that the venerated Bishop was the victim of a callous crime. So, whither are we bound?

As regards what is now known as the “Anglophone Problem” (I always use this appellation with hesitation because I have never understood whether it means the Anglophones have a problem, or that Anglophones constitute a problem, and if so for whom?) certain measures have been announced as an answer to the complaints that were put forward by the teachers and lawyers. The simple fact is that an academic year has been lost, lawyers are still on strike, many Anglophones have been forced to escape into exile and others remain in prison. Internet that was disconnected was brought back after 93 days and an outcry that was echoed over the whole world against such a collective form of punishment. We emerged from the saga with a world record of the longest-running Internet blackout – a record in which some have taken pride as proof of power, with some even expecting the deprived regions to feel grateful for the reconnection.

Anglophone prelates from all the oldest churches of Cameroon (Baptist, Catholic and Presbyterian Churches) have now been dragged to court. An unfortunate atmosphere has been created in which being an Anglophone now constitutes the first indices of being a secessionist, a troublemaker or a potential terrorist. I speak with the certainty of one of those who have been so classified. That is what it has come to, for those who worry for the country, seek equality equity and dialogue. That is what it has come to, a situation in which, when one makes concrete proposals after factual and reasoned analysis of the facts, one can be branded a potential enemy of the nation. If the ever-increasing trend of bad governance is not reversed very soon, we will wake up in a country that none of us recognize. The first step will be to reverse certain unfortunate results of the knee-jerk approach we have had in response to the outcry of our Cameroonian brothers and sisters. National healing is the primary guarantee for national dialogue.

So what should we do to start the healing?

On the Matter of Ongoing Criminal Proceedings:
It is generally accepted that the release of all those arrested will boost the goodwill and pave the way to dialogue. The law actually allows for this. As regards the detainees and the different trials going on in the Military Tribunal Regions as well in the courts in the Anglophone regions, against citizens, clerics and prelates, it is important to recall the provisions of Article 64 (1) of the Criminal Procedure Code which states:

“The Procureur General of a Court of Appeal may, by express authority of the Ministry in Charge of Justice, enter a nolle prosequi, at any stage before judgment on the merits is delivered, if such proceedings could seriously imperil social interest or public order.”

This provision of the law describes the exact situation we are in. It is applicable to the ordinary courts. An equivalent provision exists for the proceedings instituted before the Military Jurisdictions. This is section 12 of the Law No.2008 of December 2008 Organizing Military Justice Anyone talking about peace and reconciliation in good faith should immediately resort to these provision, to put a halt to the current situation, which is accelerating the country’s glide towards division and conflict. I remember assisting my brother, Batonnier Bernard Muna, in drafting the Amnesty Law that was proposed to the then Secretary General of the Presidency of the Republic of Cameroon, Mr. Sadou Hayatou, for the attention of the Head of State. It was sent to Parliament and adopted in the interest of peace and reconciliation. A telex message was even sent from the Presidency congratulating Bernard for his patriotic spirit. Today, here we are, Cameroonians, asking for this. International organisations and NGOs have joined the chorus. We should heed these calls and save our nation from further division. Those who sought refuge in arrogance and repression must certainly realize that this is choking the country.

On the Matter of Common Law Magistrates and Judges:
I have read that a Common Law section has been opened at the School of Magistracy and that exams will be scheduled. It is good that concrete solutions are being proposed, but we can and should go further than that. The above action will take at least four years to start producing results. The law does already provide us with a solution that that will produce almost immediate results and cause us to start conforming not only to the Common Law training but also to the Common law culture and tradition: Section 14 of Decree No. 2004/080 from the 13th of April 2004, lays down a procedure for lawyers and other categories of trained jurists to be integrated in to the Magistracy at different grades depending on their years of experience. This is the Common Law tradition. Some lawyers with revered experience and with reputations for moral rectitude could be selected to become judges.

Not only would this provide an almost immediate solution, but also, it would be applying the Common Law tradition whereby a large number of members of the judiciary are recruited from the private Bar. To date only one person seems to have benefited from this tradition. That is the late Chief SML Endeley who started out as a Barrister before becoming the Chief Justice of West Cameroon. A reminder of this fact was the strong showing of the Bar at his historic funeral in Buea.

In a country where there is a total lack of trust towards a government that is long on promises and short on delivery, there are many who do not see any of the proposed measures bearing fruit anytime soon. Instead, they are viewed as yet another ruse – another dilatory tactic. Decentralization is contained in the 1996 Constitution, and over twenty years later, the Regions yet have to elect a President. A measure that was promoted as the equivalent of a federation in 1996 has since 2004 been watered down to a structure in which elected officials are under the control of political appointees. Even in that watered down form, 13 years after, nothing has happened. I am afraid that in the present climate, any attempt at decentralization under the current legal framework will not address any of the substantial issues that are now being raised.

On the Matter of the Lost Academic Year:
If all the measures outlined above implemented, to show the government’s good faith in addressing the issues at hand, further steps can then be taken to address the interrupted school year. Specifically, intensive courses could be offered over the long vacation, along with a special second session of all the exams that have been disrupted. The start of the next academic year may even be slightly delayed, but we would have gone a long way in making amends. I hear there is an African proverb which says “when an adult falls, he stand up looks back; and when a child falls, he stands up looks forward”. The way to peace, dialogue and unity cannot be paved by the arrogant use of power and retributive justice. Even after 27 years of suffering, Mandela harnessed the wrath of a downtrodden people, who had witnessed the subjugation and murder of their own by an imperious few on the basis of race. In this present juncture the powers that be, have to decide on which side of history they choose to take their place.

I will conclude with a few lines on the Commission for Bilingualism and Multiculturalism. The biggest problem in policy nowadays is enforcement. Given this fact, anytime an institution is created with only advisory prerogatives, we might as well forget about the capacity of such an institution to be a tool to assist in the resolution of pressing issues. The Committee will have to provide advice, which can be accepted or rejected. Even if such advice is acquiesced, it must be followed by policy development, which in turn would need to be implemented effectively. If we are taking over 21 years, and still counting, to implement settled Constitutional provisions, we are kidding ourselves when we point to this Commission as the solution to any of the current issues. If you add to this equation the nature of its mandate, then we might just begin to understand the nature of the farce.

The time wasted weaving this web of division in which we unfortunately find ourselves distracts us from other seething issues that must be considered with the same amount of urgency.

First among these is the problem of the management of landed property in our country. The preamble of our constitution affirms, “The State shall ensure the protection of minorities and shall preserve the rights of indigenous populations in accordance with the law”; we should remember that according to article 65 of the same constitution, the preamble is part of the constitution.
The opacity in which the mining of minerals is managed in the Eastern Region of Cameroon in total absence of any discernable governance principles is saddening. The consequence of this on the lives of the “indigenous population” will come to haunt us. The management of lands in Kribi is not accompanied by any policy that is aimed at protecting the indigenous populations. The management of the returned land in Fako from the CDC to the rightful indigenous population is fraught with all manner of mismanagement. In the Extreme North a war is raging on perpetrated by a group of terrorists and bandits attempting to pass for religious fanatics. All international assessments have concluded that, the dire economic situation of the population has exposed them and they have fallen prey to the enticements and threats from these charlatans who unsuccessfully try to hide under the cover of a respectable religion.

As we tread forward, we must be ignited again by the spirit of a time when our country was poised for true greatness and distinction, not in spite of our differences, but precisely because of them. A time when the synthesis of Anglophone and Francophone cultures meant that we would be able to draw on the best of both parts. A time when we were convinced that we would be more competitive on the global stage because we could do business in the world’s major languages. A time when we knew that, even through our music, we would be able to appeal to many more. To borrow words from one of our founding fathers, Um Nyobe (also at a time when Cameroon was at a crossroads), the first step in moving Cameroon forward is by actively combating tribalism, and creating a system that is based on the best each of us have to offer. It is time for better governance that is in tune with the ideas and solutions proposed by those who love this country, and not one that seeks to silence the voices that disagree with the status quo. It is never too late to do the right thing.

In Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart”, he makes a savvy use of proverbs from the Igbo people. One that comes to mind is: "the lizard that jumped from the high Iroko tree to the ground said he would praise himself if no one else did”. Like the lizard, some are marching all over the country, monopolizing the public media in self-praise, while everyone else watches in complete stupefaction. They see that the center can no longer hold because things are falling apart. However, it is not too late to change our course.

 

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bogus@bogus.com (Team237) Editorial Tue, 04 Jul 2017 05:55:39 +0000
When will this end in Cameroon? http://cameroon-concord.com/8778-when-will-this-end-in-cameroon http://cameroon-concord.com/8778-when-will-this-end-in-cameroon When will this end in Cameroon?

There is one major observation many Cameroonians have made. The comportment of ministers during a visual encounter with the media.
Almost every minister works tooth and nail to have Biya's picture at the background.
When a  minister wants to give an interview, they first look round if a gigantic photograph of the president is behind them.{loadposition myposition} 
If they can't spot a picture within the  camera frame, they rush the team to where they can find one. That's loyalty, of course.
I was reading an article on Cameroon-Info.Net when my eyes fell on the Minister of External Relations. Le Jeune Mbella Mbella has a huge photo of Biya behind him, as he holds a document in a seeming reading manner.
And most interestingly, that photo depicts Biya in his very earliest life. The president is young, of course.
Who knows what could happen to a minister who uses Biya's real photo, portraying a face battling with the unseen hands of age? Prison or retirement, who knows.
Eighty-four-year-old Paul Biya commands a lot of respect or fear, depending on how you see it.
He has been in power for over three decades. Most of his men have wound up behind bars, even those who were presumed to be his right-hand puppets.{loadposition myposition2} 

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bogus@bogus.com (Concord Essen) Editorial Mon, 03 Jul 2017 09:15:46 +0000